by Carabe, Alejandro, España, Samuel, Grassberger, Clemens and Paganetti, Harald
Abstract:
Proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is known to depend on the ($alpha$/$beta$)x of irradiated tissues, with evidence of ∼60% variation over ($alpha$/$beta$)x values from 1-10 Gy. The range of ($alpha$/$beta$)x values reported for prostate tumors (1.2-5.0 Gy), brain tumors (10-15 Gy) and liver tumors (13-17 Gy) imply that the proton RBE for these tissues could vary significantly compared to the commonly used generic value of 1.1. Our aim is to evaluate the impact of this uncertainty on the proton dose in Gy(RBE) absorbed in normal and tumor tissues. This evaluation was performed for standard and hypofractionated regimens. RBE-weighted total dose (RWTD) distributions for 15 patients (five prostate tumors, five brain tumors and five liver tumors) were calculated using an in-house developed RBE model as a function of dose, dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd) and ($alpha$/$beta$)x. Variations of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the organs at risk due to changes of ($alpha$/$beta$)x and fractionation regimen were calculated and the RWTD received by 10% and 90% of the organ volume reported. The goodness of the plan, bearing the uncertainties, was then evaluated compared to the delivered plan, which considers a constant RBE of 1.1. For standard fractionated regimens, the prostate tumors, liver tumors and all critical structures in the brain showed typically larger RBE values than 1.1. However, in hypofractionated regimens lower values of RBE than 1.1 were observed in most cases. Based on DVH analysis we found that the RBE variations were clinically significant in particular for the prostate GTV and the critical structures in the brain. Despite the uncertainties in the biological input parameters when estimating RBE values, the results show that the use of a variable RBE with dose, LETd and ($alpha$/$beta$)x could help to further optimize the target dose in proton treatment planning. Most importantly, this study shows that the consideration of RBE variations could influence the comparison of proton and photon treatments in clinical trials, in particular in the case of the prostate.
Reference:
Clinical consequences of relative biological effectiveness variations in proton radiotherapy of the prostate, brain and liver. (Carabe, Alejandro, España, Samuel, Grassberger, Clemens and Paganetti, Harald), In Physics in Medicine and Biology, IOP Publishing, volume 58, 2013.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{Carabe:2013hl,
author = {Carabe, Alejandro and Espa{~n}a, Samuel and Grassberger, Clemens and Paganetti, Harald},
title = {{Clinical consequences of relative biological effectiveness variations in proton radiotherapy of the prostate, brain and liver.}},
journal = {Physics in Medicine and Biology},
year = {2013},
volume = {58},
number = {7},
pages = {2103--2117},
month = apr,
publisher = {IOP Publishing},
affiliation = {Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA19104, USA. a.carabe@uphs.upenn.edu},
doi = {10.1088/0031-9155/58/7/2103},
pmid = {23470339},
language = {English},
rating = {0},
date-added = {2014-11-11T11:37:00GMT},
date-modified = {2020-07-09T13:27:50GMT},
abstract = {Proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is known to depend on the ($alpha$/$beta$)x of irradiated tissues, with evidence of ∼60% variation over ($alpha$/$beta$)x values from 1-10 Gy. The range of ($alpha$/$beta$)x values reported for prostate tumors (1.2-5.0 Gy), brain tumors (10-15 Gy) and liver tumors (13-17 Gy) imply that the proton RBE for these tissues could vary significantly compared to the commonly used generic value of 1.1. Our aim is to evaluate the impact of this uncertainty on the proton dose in Gy(RBE) absorbed in normal and tumor tissues. This evaluation was performed for standard and hypofractionated regimens. RBE-weighted total dose (RWTD) distributions for 15 patients (five prostate tumors, five brain tumors and five liver tumors) were calculated using an in-house developed RBE model as a function of dose, dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd) and ($alpha$/$beta$)x. Variations of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the organs at risk due to changes of ($alpha$/$beta$)x and fractionation regimen were calculated and the RWTD received by 10% and 90% of the organ volume reported. The goodness of the plan, bearing the uncertainties, was then evaluated compared to the delivered plan, which considers a constant RBE of 1.1. For standard fractionated regimens, the prostate tumors, liver tumors and all critical structures in the brain showed typically larger RBE values than 1.1. However, in hypofractionated regimens lower values of RBE than 1.1 were observed in most cases. Based on DVH analysis we found that the RBE variations were clinically significant in particular for the prostate GTV and the critical structures in the brain. Despite the uncertainties in the biological input parameters when estimating RBE values, the results show that the use of a variable RBE with dose, LETd and ($alpha$/$beta$)x could help to further optimize the target dose in proton treatment planning. Most importantly, this study shows that the consideration of RBE variations could influence the comparison of proton and photon treatments in clinical trials, in particular in the case of the prostate.},
url = {http://stacks.iop.org/0031-9155/58/i=7/a=2103?key=crossref.7d7cb0de94ab1e9b90c0c4e46ca554b1},
uri = {url{papers3://publication/doi/10.1088/0031-9155/58/7/2103}}
}